Frequent question: What happens if my mole hurts?

Is it normal for a mole to hurt?

Moles, or melanocytic nevi, can sometimes be painful even if nothing is wrong. In some cases, a normal benign mole will have a pimple forming directly beneath it, which can get temporarily stuck. This can cause more pain and take longer to clear up than a normal pimple because it can’t easily travel to the surface.

When should you be worried about a mole?

If you have any moles that are larger than most, have smudgy or irregular edges, are uneven in colour or have some pinkness, you should see a doctor and get them checked. Any moles that appear newly in adulthood should be checked. The most concerning sign, however, is a changing mole.

How do I know if a mole is bad?

It’s important to get a new or existing mole checked out if it:

  1. changes shape or looks uneven.
  2. changes colour, gets darker or has more than 2 colours.
  3. starts itching, crusting, flaking or bleeding.
  4. gets larger or more raised from the skin.

Why does my mole suddenly hurt?

Even though a painful mole can have a non-cancerous cause, some melanomas are accompanied by pain and soreness. Melanoma is a very rare form of skin cancer, but also the most dangerous form. See a doctor for mole pain that doesn’t go away after a few days or a week.

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What does a suspicious mole look like?

Border that is irregular: The edges of suspicious moles are ragged, notched or blurred in outline, while healthy moles tend to have more even borders. The pigment of the mole may also spread into the surrounding skin. Color that is uneven: The mole may have various colors present, including black, brown and tan.

How does melanoma make you feel?

General symptoms

hard or swollen lymph nodes. hard lump on your skin. unexplained pain. feeling very tired or unwell.

How serious is a cancerous mole?

Malignant melanoma, which starts out as a mole, is the most dangerous form of skin cancer, killing almost 10,000 people each year. The majority of melanomas are black or brown, but they can be almost any color; skin-colored, pink, red, purple, blue or white. Melanomas are caused mainly by intense UV exposure.

Can a cancerous mole fall off?

Moles can and do disappear, and a disappearing mole is not often a cause for concern. However, cancerous moles can also suddenly disappear. If the cancer has spread to other areas of the body, it will remain even when the mole is gone. Learn more about disappearing moles and when to see a doctor.

Can I remove a mole myself?

Skin mole removal treatments

You should never remove a mole at home on your own. A doctor might remove a skin mole by either shaving or surgical cutting. A dermatologist may shave off smaller moles but recommend cutting for larger or cancerous ones. Depending on the size of the removal area, you may need stitches.

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What does an inflamed mole look like?

An inflamed mole (nevus) can become more red in appearance and begin to swell, making it look like it has grown. This tends to occur from irritation when healthy moles are rubbed or injured, such as with habits like shaving.

Can you have a cancerous mole for years?

They can change or even disappear over the years, and very rarely can become skin cancers. Some research suggests that having more than 50 common moles may increase one’s risk of melanoma.

Can you have stage 4 melanoma and not know it?

When stage 4 melanoma is diagnosed after a scan, there may be no symptoms at all, and it can be difficult to believe the cancer has spread. However, people with stage 4 melanoma may have a very wide range of symptoms. People who have melanoma diagnosed in the brain are told not to drive.

What does Stage 1 melanoma look like?

Stage I melanoma is no more than 1.0 millimeter thick (about the size of a sharpened pencil point), with or without an ulceration (broken skin). There is no evidence that Stage I melanoma has spread to the lymph tissues, lymph nodes, or body organs.